Sunday Morning … Remembering Your Pops…

20 Jun

Most of the time he would not take the day off. My dad used to work seven days a week for months on end. Then years later he realized that was bad for his health.

Workaholic. Part of the working-class mentality is having that drive, that work ethic to do the hard labor, to show up and take pride in what you do, and provide for your family.

But every once in a while he’d take a vacation though. Day trip, road trip here and there. Take a plane to Guate to visit his mom. He’d call her all the time but didn’t make a regular yearly trip to see her until I was in college. After years and years of hard work he learned that taking a day off was good for his mental well-being.

Monday’s and holidays. Those were his days off, the days he’d sleep in, maybe go to the driving range and hit a few. Go to the movies with my cousin, call to hang out with me, visit my uncle at the cemetery. Eat fried fish at the Marisco place down the street, the one that unfortunately is no longer there. I think the owner sold it a few years back and now it’s just something called a bistro, and the last time I heard of one of those was when Jack Tripper opened up one of his own after working at Angelino’s.

He’d still work on Sunday’s though, even if it was Father’s Day. So if I wasn’t working, I’d make the drive just to hang for a bit at the shop. Told him I’d buy him a cup of coffee. Talk about life. He’d laugh at the thought of his daughter talking about life over a cup of coffee, seeing how I did t drink coffee. But I’d do it anyway.

I’d tell him I’d see him later for dinner, which usually involved a steak, sometimes Italian food, but most of the time steak followed by Lakers game, Dodgers game or HBO.

Today’s the day to think of that. To think about the conversations I had but can’t quite remember, but knew I had them. Time to remember his smile and the feeling of hanging out, to remember his laughter, the smell of his musk aftershave, white collared shirts, and butcher’s coat. Time to remember the times he didn’t wear white, like when we used to go to plays and talk during the intermission, to remember the hard times and the good times, because there were both. Time to remember that 11 years ago, Father’s Day was the last time I had a conversation with my friend in a hospital room, that last time he’d talk back. I remember leaving the television on and telling the nurses not to change the channel because the World Cup was on and he loved watching it. He might not have been able to see it, but maybe he’d be able to hear the famous GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOL! GOOOOOOOOOL QUE GOLAZO!

Most definitely.

It’s the day to celebrate and remember your dads. The ones that you were born with, the ones that saw you in diapers, and the ones who acted like your dad, encouraged you and supported you even if you weren’t related, they were still family. To brothers and uncles that had your back, to teachers and coaches that helped you when you needed it.

It’s tough being a good dad. Pressures weigh heavily on the shoulders of a family man, and not everyone is strong enough to fill that role. Not everyone can handle that. Now with raising my own family, I realize that. So it’s important to highlight the ones that do. To the ones that pay the bills and show up to soccer practice, and basketball games before beer with the guys, to the ones that are there for Saturday morning cartoons, even if they’re just sleeping next to you on the couch, to the ones who read The Very Hungry Caterpillar and other bedtime stories, to the ones who teach you how to drive and change a flat tire, to the MacGyver’s and the remote control masters who cross wires and eventually fix the DVD-VCR-Cable connection, to the ones that high-five you when you succeed or pat you on the back when you don’t, to the ones who snore so loud they can inhale the wallpaper if you had any, to the ones that tell you to chase your dreams, to the ones who have a cup of coffee with their daughter and talk about life … today’s your day.

Happy Father’s Day

Buen Camino …

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8 Responses to “Sunday Morning … Remembering Your Pops…”

  1. Sorryless June 20, 2021 at 8:13 PM #

    Guat,

    It’s always the best, most poignant read on WordPress when you write about your father. Always, every time. Thank you for sharing that cup of coffee with us.

    • The Guat June 27, 2021 at 8:46 PM #

      Thanks brother. Father’s Day is always a tough one. But sharing sometimes feels good as people get to know him and our friendship:) thanks for reading. Hope your Sunday was a good one celebrating yourself too! 🙂

  2. claywatkins June 22, 2021 at 7:13 AM #

    I love your stories about your dad. Our dads are from the generation where family and hard work were defined. I am forever grateful to men like your dad and my own dad for what they taught me by their values. Stay well and happy. Peace.

    • The Guat June 27, 2021 at 8:48 PM #

      Thanks so much Clay. Sometimes Dads like that aren’t around too much. Completely agree with you about how that generation was defined. And I’m with you, super grateful for what they taught us. Thanks for hanging out and for the good vibes. Hope you had a good weekend :)sending you good vibes.

  3. Island Traveler July 1, 2021 at 11:46 AM #

    Beautiful, loving, inspiring tribute to an amazing person and Dad. Thank you🙏

    • The Guat July 3, 2021 at 8:06 AM #

      Thanks for the kind words 🙂 Everyday is a good day to remember things like that, but Father’s Day is a little something extra.

  4. Island Traveler July 3, 2021 at 10:40 AM #

    Happy Weekend full of fun and blissful adventures☀️🙏

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